Erick Stoll

rtnt:

Read This, Not That is 6 Months Old!
Hope everyone here in the states had a pleasant holiday weekend. As of yesterday, we’ve been operating outside the newscycle to curate the finest long reads on the internet for half a year now.
The feedback we’re getting is great, and the follower count continues to grow, so we must be doing something right. And thanks to everyone, for reading and sharing and showing that there is an audience for long form content on the internet—yes, even on Tumblr!
To celebrate the occassion, we’ve updated our So What The Fuck is Read This, Not That? page and gathered our Top 10 Favorite RTNT Posts of all time. Read ‘em, and as always, let us know what you think:
1.  Trial By Fire: Did Texas Execute an Innocent Man?A sloppy investigation and a broken justice system lead to the execution of Cameron Todd Willingham for the alleged murder of his three children.David Grann, New Yorker, September 2009
2.  Speak, MoneyHow power has shifted away from the electorate in the United States.Roger D. Hodge, excerpt from The Mendacity of Hope, October 2010
3.  Within the Context of No ContextBrilliant exposition on the state of American culture and twentieth-century life.George Trow, New Yorker, November 1980
4.  Debt: The First 5,000 YearsThe development of our system of money was neither inevitable nor necessarily beneficial. Aaron Bady, New Inquiry, February 2012
5.  The Science of Why We Don’t Believe in ScienceWhen confronted with evidence that contradicts their views, people have a worrying tendency to ignore the evidence. Chris Mooney, Mother Jones, June 2011
6.  Raise the Crime RateReform isn’t enough—the prison system is a moral catastrophe and must be dismantled.Christopher Glazek, n+1, January 2012
7.  The Elusive Big IdeaWe have access to and consume more information than ever before, but it’s not doing us any good.Neil Gabler, New York Times, August 2011
8.  Dumb Like a FoxFox News’ agenda isn’t political, but commercial—the network has simply mastered the cable news format better than its competitors.Terry McDermott, Columbia Journalism Review, April 2010
9.  The Way it WasStories of what it was like for women before Roe v. Wade.Eleanor Cooney, Mother Jones, October 2004
10.  Generation Why?We limit our idea of what a person is when we reduce our complexities to the confines of Facebook.Zadie Smith, New York Review of Books, November 2010
How about you? Has RTNT changed your reading habits? What are some of your favorite pieces you’ve read so far? Share them with us via the submit feature, and we’ll make a readers’ choice list this Friday!
And changes you would like to see to RTNT’s programming or any new features you’d like on the website? We have some ideas in the pipeline, but we want to hear from you!
We hope this audience continues to seek out the long form journalism that is so crucial to the well-being of our society. We also hope that you encourage those close to you—your co-worker who goes on about celebrity headlines, your friend who watches hour after hour of MSNBC, your relative who relays the partisan talking points of the day—-to alter their media diet, abandoning the junk in favor of something more substantial.
Thank you, and always remember, you are what you read. 
// Follow Read This, Not That on Tumblr / Facebook / Twitter //

rtnt:

Read This, Not That is 6 Months Old!

Hope everyone here in the states had a pleasant holiday weekend. As of yesterday, we’ve been operating outside the newscycle to curate the finest long reads on the internet for half a year now.

The feedback we’re getting is great, and the follower count continues to grow, so we must be doing something right. And thanks to everyone, for reading and sharing and showing that there is an audience for long form content on the internet—yes, even on Tumblr!

To celebrate the occassion, we’ve updated our So What The Fuck is Read This, Not That? page and gathered our Top 10 Favorite RTNT Posts of all time. Read ‘em, and as always, let us know what you think:

1.  Trial By Fire: Did Texas Execute an Innocent Man?
A sloppy investigation and a broken justice system lead to the execution of Cameron Todd Willingham for the alleged murder of his three children.
David Grann, New Yorker, September 2009

2.  Speak, Money
How power has shifted away from the electorate in the United States.
Roger D. Hodge, excerpt from The Mendacity of Hope, October 2010

3.  Within the Context of No Context
Brilliant exposition on the state of American culture and twentieth-century life.
George Trow, New Yorker, November 1980

4.  Debt: The First 5,000 Years
The development of our system of money was neither inevitable nor necessarily beneficial. 
Aaron Bady, New Inquiry, February 2012

5.  The Science of Why We Don’t Believe in Science
When confronted with evidence that contradicts their views, people have a worrying tendency to ignore the evidence. 
Chris Mooney, Mother Jones, June 2011

6.  Raise the Crime Rate
Reform isn’t enough—the prison system is a moral catastrophe and must be dismantled.
Christopher Glazek, n+1, January 2012

7.  The Elusive Big Idea
We have access to and consume more information than ever before, but it’s not doing us any good.
Neil Gabler, New York Times, August 2011

8.  Dumb Like a Fox
Fox News’ agenda isn’t political, but commercial—the network has simply mastered the cable news format better than its competitors.
Terry McDermott, Columbia Journalism Review, April 2010

9.  The Way it Was
Stories of what it was like for women before Roe v. Wade.
Eleanor Cooney, Mother Jones, October 2004

10.  Generation Why?
We limit our idea of what a person is when we reduce our complexities to the confines of Facebook.
Zadie Smith, New York Review of Books, November 2010

How about you? Has RTNT changed your reading habits? What are some of your favorite pieces you’ve read so far? Share them with us via the submit feature, and we’ll make a readers’ choice list this Friday!

And changes you would like to see to RTNT’s programming or any new features you’d like on the website? We have some ideas in the pipeline, but we want to hear from you!

We hope this audience continues to seek out the long form journalism that is so crucial to the well-being of our society. We also hope that you encourage those close to you—your co-worker who goes on about celebrity headlines, your friend who watches hour after hour of MSNBC, your relative who relays the partisan talking points of the day—-to alter their media diet, abandoning the junk in favor of something more substantial.

Thank you, and always remember, you are what you read.
 

// Follow Read This, Not That on Tumblr / Facebook / Twitter //

  • 29 May 2012
  • 96